Your cart
Close Alternative Icon
Down Arrow Icon

Meet the Makers

Devyani Smith: Artist-Ceramicist

Devyani Smith: Artist-Ceramicist
While earthenware and terracotta – be it the humble ‘kulhar’ to the timeless ‘matka’ (earthen pot) - continue to be part of our day-to-day life across the country, studio pottery largely led by tableware has found a significant place in the plastic arts in post-independence India. Devyani Smith is one of the emerging names within this studio pottery landscape in India.  Continue reading

Ryoko Haraguchi: Indo-Japanese Collaboration

Ryoko Haraguchi: Indo-Japanese Collaboration

Haraguchi’s fascination with Indian textiles began in 1986, when she first visited the country while working for the Japanese brand, Muji. Since then, fascination transformed into a life-long passion, which Haraguchi has successfully channeled into a cross-cultural creative pursuit. Working collaboratively with skilled Indian weavers, her designs focus on the interplay of traditional Indian textiles with age-old Japanese dyeing techniques.

Continue reading

Tara Books: Playing with Narratives and Structure

Tara Books: Playing with Narratives and Structure

Based in Chennai, Tara Book's aims to change the perspective from which stories are told, while simultaneously ensuring that their books are reflective of the rich heritage of India.The hallmark of their publishing is engagement with the vibrant diversity of Indian folk and tribal art. 

Continue reading

Cultural Textiles: An Australian-Indian Dialogue Curated by Master Weaver Liz Williamson

Cultural Textiles: An Australian-Indian Dialogue Curated by Master Weaver Liz Williamson
As part of the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia study program, a young group of contemporary Australian designers worked with various artisans in Gujarat and Bengal to come up with innovative ideas in textile design to be displayed at the gallery.  Continue reading

Focus on Nagaland: Textiles of Identity

Focus on Nagaland: Textiles of Identity

Indigenous women of the Chakesang tribe from Leshemi, a remote Naga village in the mountains of North East India, continue to weave nettle shawls, unique to their own identity, on back-strapped looms. The fiber-to-fabric journey is completely local and self-sustaining, with the minor exception of the raw organic cotton used now being sourced from outside of the community. 

Continue reading